Using Data to Inform Planning

Our last blog post looked at how online forms can have a huge impact when streamlining processes in your school. They are also great for teachers to use as quizzes. Both Google and Office 365 forms can be configured as self marking quizzes. Not only does this save teachers time in marking, but it’s also instantly provides the student with feedback as to how they did and offers the teacher(s) instant analysis as to how the class(es) performed!

Office 365 example

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G Suite example

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This is really useful for in class starters or exit tickets to help gauge student understanding, or for revision quizzes as it allows students to get instant feedback to support independent learning.

Flipped learning

When I (Oli) was teaching, one of the biggest impacts of using Google Forms was how they supported a ‘flipped’ learning approach to inform lesson planning. Here’s how it looked in practice in a Maths environment (applicable to most subjects):

Step 1: Create or curate videos

Before we even started teaching a topic, we’d create video tutorials of key concepts (or find good ones already made on YouTube). If we were teaching fractions in 4 weeks time, this weeks homework would be to watch some of those videos (this could also be done in lesson time).

Step 2: Students complete a quiz online

After watching the videos, students complete a quick online quiz made in Google or Office 365 Forms. The great thing about this, is that only one teacher needs to create the Form, and each class can all complete the same one! TOP TIP: Add a question that asks for the teacher/class name and you can then filter the results later.

Step 3: Analyse the results before you start planning

The great thing about Forms is that you have charts automatically made for you for each question. This is really useful as you start planning as it lets you know if there are any fundamental topics that the class have struggled with, or likewise anything that the class really understand and that can save you wasting too much lesson time covering it.

Forms also automatically link to spreadsheets which allows you to really drill down and identify if there are any individual students who might need a bit of support. You can also filter a quiz by teacher or class. Having all of this data before you start planning a topic completely transforms your approach and will hopefully have a big impact on student learning outcomes!

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We’d love to hear how you are using Forms and quizzes in your school! Please feel free to add your story to our Supercloud Stories of Impact at lgfl.link/cloudimpact

Using online forms to streamline data collection

Many schools send out paper forms to parents to collect information or permission. This can be really inefficient as it can rely on the student to be organised enough to be the delivery person and then a member of staff to collate the data and chase any missing responses.

A great feature of cloud platforms such as G Suite and Office 365 is that anyone can easily create an online form to capture any information they want. These forms can be filled out by anyone (even on a smart phone), which makes it really easy to send directly out to parents and you don’t have to rely on students to take a piece of paper home and bring it back in!

The responses are automatically collated for easy analysis, which massively reduces staff administration time, and missing respondents can be easily chased at the click of a button!

Here is an example travel survey made in Google Forms.

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You can create Forms really easily in both platforms right away!

G Suite: Click ‘New’ in your Google Drive or head to forms.google.com

Office 365: Head to forms.office.com

If you need any help getting setup with a cloud platform, please email oli.trussell@lgfl.net (G Suite) or jose.kingsley@lgfl.net (Office 365) today!

Supercloud Stories of Impact

We have launched a new resource to help schools share and discover new ideas as to how cloud is having an impact across LGfL. Our new ‘Supercloud Stories of Impact’ portal brings together ideas from schools in small bite size chunks which you can filter to meet your needs.

Each story is one slide outlining the:

  • problem
  • solution
  • impact

…followed by simple guidance or instructions on how to implement yourself.

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Visit lgfl.link/cloudimpact to access the portal

We would love for staff across London to share the impact that cloud is having in their schools. Please do get involved and help inspire others!

Digital Transformation Audit Tool

There is so much more to successful digital transformation than simply getting in a load of devices. We know that it can be overwhelming even knowing where to start, and what is most important to your school situation when trying to drive change.

We’ve created a simple self reflective audit tool that is designed to help with this process by:

  • Identifying current position of the school regarding digital transformation
  • Identifying important next steps to ensure success
  • Creating a plan with manageable and actionable goals

You can access the tool for free today at lgfl.link/DTFAudit

After you’ve completed the tool you’ll get a report (example below) emailed to you which you can use to plan next steps with specific time frames which is really useful when sharing a vision and for accountability purposes. You’ll also receive a unique link so that you can come back and update your results at any time – a really rewarding way of tracking and showing progress.

If you have any questions, or want to find out more about how we can support your digital transformation, please email Oli (Google expert) or Jose (Microsoft expert) at oli.trussell@lgfl.net and jose.kingsley@lgfl.net

Link to report example (and embedded below)

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GSuite: Reimagine the Writing Process

There are so many great ways to really enhance the writing process when using G Suite for Education. Whether you are brand new to using G Suite, or a Google Classroom ninja, this short blog post will give you some ideas as to how you might help learners with their writing (and even save you time in the process!).

Google Classroom

Google Classroom is a fantastic tool that helps streamline your digital workflow! Instead of making photocopies of worksheets, or getting students to scribble in their books, you can use Google Classroom to generate digital copies of your worksheets (or simply blank documents) for every student in your class. You can then see all the student work (live and in real-time!) in one place and give live formative feedback.

Google Docs

Google Docs is the word processor in Google Drive. It’s the G Suite equivalent of Microsoft Word and because it lives in the cloud, there are some great additional functionalities. Here’s 5 features that should enhance the way you work with your students:

1) Live comments

Select any text and add your comment! Students see these in real time and in context of their work. They can reply to your comment, edit without having to redraft the whole section, and easily track changes and comments over time.

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2) Voice typing

Voice typing is built in to any Google Doc; find it in the ‘Tools’ menu. It’s a great way for students (and teachers) to get what’s in their head into writing. It’s an incredible accessibility tool for SEND learners – take a look at some examples of the formatting that’s possible:

3) Draftback

Every Google Doc has an inbuilt Version History where you can track how a document looked at different points in time – great for evidencing student progress and developing student metacognition. Even better, there is a great free Chrome Extension called Draftback which allows you to play back a document as it was written! This is really useful when supporting students – and even looking for plagiarism!

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4) CheckMark (marking codes)

CheckMark is a great free Chrome Extension that allows you to use marking codes that you may use in your school (‘C’ for capitalisation, ‘sp’ for spelling etc…) in a Google Doc. Once you’ve enabled it, simply double click on a word and a magic box appears above it. Then choose which comment you want, and it will automatically add it as a written comment without you having to type a thing – a real time saver! It even counts how many times you’ve made the same type of feedback!

5) Video feedback

After you’ve given your students’ their feedback, they will need to act on it and (hopefully) improve their work. Sometimes students are able to act on your feedback when you sit down and discuss it with them. Unfortunately this isn’t always possible with a class of 32 students in the contact time you spend with them. A great way around this is to leave your students some video feedback using the extension Screencastify.

We hope that you found some of these suggestions useful! Please leave us a comment if you try one of them out!